Adding Value to Ads

Let me list down three of the most attractive commercials on Philippine TV (according to my biased, superficial opinion). I know a lot of people have been talking about these commercials and it’s high time to take this opportunity to cling to their popularity.

FIRST LOVE
McDonald’s latest commercial (courtesy of DDB Philippines) gave me a mixed feeling of unexplained emotion and nostalgia. The storyline was simple yet impressive (watch: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zzkFry48P1I). The catch – childhood sweethearts never ended up being with each other. The hard part was when the guy (GMA’s Gino dela Pena) met his childhood sweetheart’s husband (ouch!). Of course, everything happened in McDo. It’s the kind of commercial you’ll hang on to until it ends. It did touch a lot of Pinoys’ hearts. I bet the emphasis on the choco sundae would boost its sales (oh, and the fries, too!) Nice work. *still singing ‘Ang Huling El Bimbo’ while writing this*

UNILAB BA ‘YAN?
Hats off to Unilab’s new catchphrase – Unilab ba ‘yan? Although this may not evolve as a word of mouth like “I love you Piolo!” or “Goodbye, Carlo” yet I’m sure consumers will recall this commercial whenever they buy any drug/medicine. I believe the ad is amazing.

GREENWICH FOURSOME
I love the whole gang of John Lloyd Cruz in Greenwich commercials. The four of them are symbolic of the four types of people who eat pizza. The concept is catchy and customers tend to identify themselves through the four characters (thereby rushing to the pizza store and daydreaming that they are the ones in the ad).

The advertising industry in the Philippines is evolving. I hope advertisers will continue to produce sensible ads.

*Note: The author was not paid to advertise the brands mentioned above (he wishes) *wink*

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A Truckload of Stupidity

This is about “Ordinance 261 (An Ordinance Regulating the Hauling and Transporting of Sand, Gravel, and other Quarry Materials), which aims to prevent commercial quarry trucks from overloading sand by instituting measures like reducing truck height, removal of truck axle, among others.”

Quarrying has been a big issue for the people of Pampanga. The quarry business became a big hit since Pinatubo erupted. Billions of pesos are earned by the provincial government because of the said activity, and now, everyone wants a piece of the expensive cake!

Even before the assumption of Ordinance 261, many politicians have been bullying governor-elect Ed Panlilio. The wrath of greedy Kapampangans who are hungry for power and money do everything they can to oust the provincial head. Fr. Ed doesn’t lack leadership qualities. Instead, he doesn’t have that ‘Pinoy politician (trapo)’ factor – corrupt and evil.

Obviously, the ordinance is for the good of all. With its implementation, roads will not be battered, accidents will be prevented, and quarry activity shall be regulated. But the minds of the people against the good government of Fr. Ed aren’t in favor of something that will benefit the Kapampangan people. Backed-up by powerful groups (who are craving to get their share of money from the people’s fund), these truck drivers made a fool out of themselves (they reached the point of banging the door of the governor’s office and conducting nonsense protests since last year).

2010 is fast approaching. Isn’t it clear that old politicians are just pushing the limits to regain control of the Capitol and use the billions of money saved by the present governor to run their campaign machinery? In 2007, Kapampangans were so proud of choosing Fr. Ed over a movie star and a gambling lord. Now, the people should be enlightened regarding the situation.

There may be flaws in the leadership of the priest-turned-governor, but what is the use of protests? What can we get from biased dialogues? Let the governor finish his term and let ‘common sense’ reign.

It’s all in the ‘hood’

Whether you spell it as “h-o-o-d-i-e” or “h-o-o-d-y,” this kind of jacket is worn by every kid in town (oops, even adults). Did the recent changes in weather radically turned the Philippines into an ice-cold country? – definitely not. Boys and girls who strut the outfit joined the craze since early 2008 until today.

young-hooded-male-thumb5172625I have two hoodies (with emphasis on the plural form). Both were gifts from friends. When the ‘hoodies fever’ arrived, I surely didn’t want to embark on a fashion adjustment. In fact, I didn’t know if it’ll look good on me or not. When I started to feel the chilling breeze of the ‘ber’ season, I thought I needed a hoodie.  Trusting my friends’ fashion tastes, I started wearing hoodies. Alright, it’s cold, and I need to look a little buff, so putting on a hoodie meant a lot. One thing I can’t grasp is the thing about the hood itself (except for the fact that it’ll not be called a hoodie without the hood).

After a little online research, I found out that this sort of fashion trend started in the 1930’s. Hoodies also remind me of hip-hop as well as shoplifters who want to conceal their faces. Short for ‘hooded sweatshirt,’ wearing these is now considered as one hell of a fad!

For as long as it serves its purpose, I’ll continue wearing hoodies.

Photo credit: http://thumbs.dreamstime.com/thumb_269/1210816131fF387Q.jpg